Anyone who follows the Indigenous Veld Goats South Africa group on Facebook will know that these are the most beautiful and charming goats. (The photo above is of the famous Omkhulu, a Skilder ram bred by LGL Indigenous Veld Goat Skilder Stud.)

The Indigenous Veld Goat (IVG) was officially registered as a breed in 2006 and a breeders’ society was established.

Beautiful colouring

According to the Indigenous Veld Goat Society there are four distinct eco types of indigenous goat. These do not include the Boer Goat, which is the result of selective breeding.

The ecotypes are:

  • Nguni Type Goats (Mbuzi) – multi-coloured with semi pendulous ears;
  • Eastern Cape Xhosa – multi-coloured with lob ears
  • Northern Cape, Lob Eared, Speckled (Skilder) Goats
  • Kunene Type (Kaokoland) – multi-coloured with lob ears.

These goats have developed naturally towards functional efficiency and the breeders place great emphasis on fertility, femininity and masculinity.

Multiple births are common

They are exceptionally fertile, even from a young age. IVG ewes are known for their extraordinary mothering abilities, and will fiercely protect their offspring and themselves with their sharp, efficient horns. They have non-seasonal breeding patterns and have a long productive lifespan. Ewes have good milk production and can easily feed twins or even triplets.

IVGs have a very strong herding instinct, which helps to protect them from predators.

The horns also aid them in getting access to food and to scratch at external parasites like ticks.

They have a lively posture and are alert. They are mobile and light-footed, with lean, long shapely legs to move with ease and to walk long distances.

IVGs are less susceptible to tick borne diseases, are also more parasite tolerant, and are generally capable of coping with drought conditions.

They have a wide variety of colours and colour patterns which helps in camouflaging and make them difficult to be spotted by predators.

For more information contact The Indigenous Veld Goat Society on 083 383 2737 or 051 445 2010 or go to their website.

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